Earthmare

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Cergat. Earthmare: The Lost Book of Wars. gnOme, 2017. ISBN-10: 0692841083. ISBN-13: 978-0692841082. 280pp. $18.00

In mid-October 1997, two clay tablets marked in wedge-shaped signs, were discovered inside a cave in the Accursed Mountains in Albania. The local shepherds who found them, took the artifacts to their pastor, an amateur linguist and folklore aficionado, who at first glance identified the cuneiform writing as Sumerian. He visited the discovery site and found several other fragments prompting him to further continue his search. In the winter months from November 1997 to February 1998, four more tablets were put together out of thirty-seven fragments collected in the interior of the cave. Six fragments (frgs. 2, 5, 18, 13, 27, 9) did not match any of the partially restored tablets, suggesting that more pieces may lay hidden deeper into the cave. These were not discovered until the end of September 1998, when a landslide revealed a separate cave pocket, enclosing a wooden ark adding three more tablets to the collection.

Clearly, the artifacts did not belong to the local culture. Their scattered condition suggested that similar earlier landslides might have caused loose tree-roots and mud to close part of the cave off from its mouth. As the texts have only been partially translated, it is as yet unknown whether the last three pieces made up the full set of the original tablets. Most of what we know comes from the notes of the pastor, who for nearly ten years worked in isolation to decipher a good part of the scripts from a language he initially believed to be the original Indo-European, but subsequently identified as the lost language of the Pelasgians. In a later note, he writes that this was a mixed language, reminiscent of Odysseus’s description of Crete, where many barbarian tongues were spoken side by side and mingled with one another (Hom. Od. xix. 172-8). After decoding the cuneiform, he translated their texts into Albanian, trying to keep as close to the original as possible. What emerged was another version of Genesis, a creation  full of strife the pastor called “the lost book of wars.”

Dating back to c. 1400-1100 bc, the tablets are among the oldest apocrypha materials ever found. They are as well of particular interest not only for their content, but also for the unusual site of their discovery. Following recent archaeological finds revealing the Philistines to be only one of a conglomerate of tribes that fought against God’s chosen people (see e.g., Bierling 2002), these ancient warriors have been conjectured to be the ones who brought the tablets from Israel.

In his description of the Sea People pirate alliance, Ramesses II (c. 1285 bc) names some of these tribes, among them the Dardanians (Da-ar-d(a)-an-ya), who, after attacking Egypt, turned their attention to Israel. As it is well known, these were Aeneas’s people, the Trojans’ allies in the war. In ancient times, however, there was also a Dardanian kingdom in present-day Kosovo, likely one of the several colonies of that branch of the Dardanian tribe that traveled westward after the sack of Troy. The pastor came to consider these people as the possible carriers of the ark and the cuneiform tablets.

Assuming that this might be what Israel called the Ark of the Covenant, which was lost to the Philistines in the wars described in 1 Samuel, the warriors who buried its contents in the Accursed Mountains may well be the ones referred to in the Bible as the giants, Goliath and company. These are the mythical giants north of Greece (ancient Gr. gegas), whose demonym still survives in the Gheg tribes of northern Albania.

“This is a truly fascinating, singular work that carves our descent into unknown ‘Earthmare’ terrain. A dark combination of daring and brilliance guides us here, through vast territories of consciousness and vision (those of the barbarian, the exile, the sea people). A book like no other.” — Jason Mohaghegh, author of The Chaotic Imagination: New Literature and Philosophy of the Middle East

“Earthmare documents a wound around/inside a hole, a hole both excavated by God and indiscernible from him, a hole the universe crawled out of in spite of itself, deranged, demonic, cancerous, riddled with paradox, coated in etymological layers of increasingly rarefied and scarified tissue. An encyclopedic drop of poison in the void. A book about beginnings and of beginnings that is beguilingly and honestly lost for any credible place to start, which is exactly where it finds itself.” — Gary J. Shipley, author of The Face Hole

“Tearing open the wound of the Beginning, Earthmare installs within each who reads it a unique secret protocol for never having been. As light as it is deep, occult as it is clear, unsettling as it is consoling, the work also charts a new ancient home for intellectual practice, one that might be provisionally designated philological horrotics (cf. Pseudo-Dionysius, Lovecraft). If ever there were, for lack of better words, a noetic intersection of Agamben, Negarestani, and Cioran, as perforce there always already is, this is it—at least for now. Archaeology of the incognitum hactenus, the trouble with being torn . . . To read Earthmare properly is to have a palpably better chance of discovering what it means to escape the future the only way possible: by altering the past.” — Nicola Masciandaro, co-author of Spheresy 1693

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Be Still, My Throbbing Tattoo

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I. P. Snooks. Be Still, My Throbbing Tattoo. ISBN-10: 0993205801. ISBN-13: 978-0993205804. gnOme. 2015. 210 pp. $12.99.

QUEEN ELIZABETH II IS DEAD … Thanks to the interdimensional revelations contained within Be Still, My Throbbing Tattoo, it is now possible to learn the truth about the deceased Queen and her reign of terror, including how she manipulated the media to make people believe a fairy story, how she spied on people via official portraits, and how she recorded their secret desires with banknotes. It is also possible to learn just how many deaths you have suffered during your wider existence, and how many worlds have been kept hidden from you by forces as dark as redactional rectangles.

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footnote to silence

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Ars Cogitanda. footnote to silence. ISBN-13: 978-0692352311. ISBN-10: 0692352317. gnOme. 2014. 62 pp. $7.00.

Cast as the footnotes to an invisible text, the beings identified as the “assembled footnoters” roil their way through the text chastising, exhorting, praising, fulminating, and otherwise reacting to that which cannot be perceived. Characters such as Gertrude, the sinoburius fossil and Stanley the long-dead Australopithecine anchor narrative components of the text, as limited as they may be. Silence, which erupts in various guises, variously represents the body, inarticulate spaces between letters, the unwanted, the unknowable. Drawing upon an large body of scientific work ranging from inter-kingdom bacterial signalling to the neurology of empathy, the manuscript explores what it means to think of ourselves as things in the world of posthuman systems theory. Referencing the powers and weaknesses of language and its more fundamental cousin somatic communication, the manuscript de-articulates standard conceptual frameworks that found themselves on passive notions of the material universe. Opening on a critique of “thing theory,” the text boils a stew of Western magical and philosophical thinking using the evidence and tropes of science as both pot and fire.

“The senses delicately collide in AR S’s work. The poet builds images with the precision touch of an author of haiku, choosing words as if they were toothpicks placed in an elaborate sculpture, yet allowing each image to expand beyond the constraints of the haiku form. Like all successful poetry, S’s work offers readers a glimpse into the poet’s perspective, a step into a synesthetic world.” – Ken Hunt (editor, Filling Station)

“In footnote to Silence, AR S luminously provides us with insight into the workings of the inner universe. While we all listen to the dramatic narrative of our lives, it is the footnotes, the asides, the glossed over insignificant events that hold reality together. By twisting our perspective to listen to the silence rather than the noise (with Silence as “the ephemeral text as an object”), we can inquire more deeply into the thoughts and experiences that compose us. In language sometimes lyrical, sometimes playful, sometimes coldly scientific, but always inventive, S leads us down the byways of the mind where limbic floods of perception await.” – John C. Goodman, author of Naked Beauty (Blue & Yellow Dog Press)

“This is a strange, wonderful book. The footnotes are alternately bewildering, deeply funny and strangely lyrical. They will persuade you, baffle you and send you off to cross-reference. They will remove the top of your head again and again.” – Jennifer Zilm, author of The Whole and Broken Yellows: Van Gogh Poems and Others (Frog Hollow Press)

“I was struck by the humour in the pages I read.” – E.W. of V

“Here at theNewerYork, one of our main guidelines for a piece of writing is that it be experimental without being obtuse. While creating an entire manuscript made up of footnotes is certainly experimental, the results, unfortunately, feel inaccessible for the most part. For this to be a more successful experiment (at least as far as we define success in such things), there would be more of a clear throughline, something more for the reader to latch onto that would compel them to continue reading. While there are snippets of intrigue to be found, such as in the discussion of the occult and tarot cards, as well as short passages with a more narrative style, like the one with Gertrude, the more compelling parts of the manuscript just do not outweigh what otherwise seems to be a very academic, dry paper in style and substance. The work doesn’t necessarily need clearer characters or more of a story, but it would benefit from more connections between ideas or more opportunities for emotional connection. It’s also possible that a strong editorial hand could cut this down to the most interesting footnotes and ideas, thus keeping the reader compelled throughout. At this length, however, the footnotes become wearisome. We won’t be accepting this manuscript. Thank you for your time and your submission.” – Daniel Bullard-Bates, theNewerYork Press

“What are you? A talking dog?” – S.G. of V.

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Un-Sight/ Un-Sound (delirium X.)

front coverM. Un-Sight/ Un-Sound (delirium X.)ISBN-13: 978-0692334799. ISBN-10: 0692334793. gnOme. 2014. 130 pp.

un-sight un-sound/ yet/ in vacuum of doubt’s expel/ clamouring for beyond flesh what meat as if/ yet forage no/ not a/ eye crushed within fist of none/ echoing chamber of nothing/ never dispelled

Un-Sight/ Un-Sound (delirium X.) is a prose-poetic work in three sequences: “delirium X,” “Meat Sequence (after Francis Bacon),” and “Ghost-Limb Tongue.” In the first, quotations from various authors (Bataille, Beckett, Luca, Popa et al.) are used as springboards for surreal imagistic fragmentation. The second section, inspired by Deleuze’s Francis Bacon, deals with the subject of flesh/ meat and explores the concept of the human object divulged of identity/ place, stripped of ego, and viewed from an externus. The third section addresses the conflict between sense and the real and concludes with a collection of aphorisms written with regard to words becoming a bankrupt form of expression in the conflict between language and the Post-Human world . . .

“It is nice to see that language too can be broken and made to rot like everything else.” – E. Elias Merhige

“M’s project is to reveal the terrible tenacity of words that stubbornly persist in meaning when we deliberately set about using them as weapons to torment the angelic cadavers strewn about where the happy holiday camps of the mindlessly grinning flowers & summer brigade used to poison the mind.” – David McLean

“[T]here are moments in Un-Sight/ Un-Sound where it seems as if the hold language has over our perceptions is being, if not broken, then at least distorted enough for us to catch a glimpse of the world that lies behind our makeshift descriptions and definitions.” – Christopher Brownsword

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Autophagiography

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A & N. Autophagiography. ISBN-13: 978-0692234204. ISBN-10: 0692234209. gnOme, 2014. 192 pp. $12.00.

A true story, hot off the wine presses of the heart. Something indescribable occurred. Communications ensued, becoming a saintly self-eating process whose vermicular trail is this book. Part romance, part mystical dialogue, part melodrama, Autophagiography is a ( )hole document of impossible love and friendship between two real inexistent persons. The results may astonish you.

Contents: I. ALP, a.k.a. Resent Morning Prayer. II. Scars of the Horizon. III. New Life. IV. Saintly Communication: A Rule. V. Postscripts

“Bitten hard by the Autophagiography‘s ‘spiral ouroboros’ even as concentration is dissipated among its narrative peculiarities, cultural allusions, codes, and ceaseless diversions, I will try to find a way to talk about it . . . ” — Nick Land

” . . . a significant accidental experiment in documentary authorship, an ‘as-is’ book with several delightful surprises and contradictions . . . the conception and editing of Autophagiography becomes an important part of the narrative itself, so that the text literally and narratively eats itself into its own real present, like some kind of monstrous love-child proverbially devouring the authors out of their inexistent sub-oceanic house and home: ‘The monster is here and I cannot stop it, I don’t want it ever to shut up. Whatever happens in this life there will be the fault of this cataclysmic now screaming to me, deafening me with the echo of a deformity that I always was’ (73) . . . One can only hope without hope that its authors somehow find happiness in this sphere or the next, or at least in a weird new somewhere that is neither.” — Anonymous, “Eating Yourself to L( )ve,” HTMLGIANT

“An anonymously authored online correspondence between amorous philosophes; a slight and capacious book that reads like so many notes from a Clarice Lispector listserv: Autophagiography is something of a specialty item. Hovering between theology and science fiction, it presents a collaborative manifesto of ‘techno-quietism’, as well as love-stricken epistolary.” — Cam, McNally Jackson Books

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Post-Autophagiography (Leftovers)

Cantos for the Crestfallen

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Pseudo-Leopardi. Cantos for the Crestfallen. Translated by A. Necrezută, F. Pilastru & I. Imaculată. ISBN-13: 978-0692218853. ISBN-10: 0692218858. gnOme, 2014. 44 pp. $10.00.

Pseudo-Leopardi’s Cantos for the Crestfallen, here translated for the first time from the Romanian original, is a breathless expiration of impossible pessimo-mystical desires for the immanent beyond. In a sequence of thirty one verses channeling the spirits of Cioran, Dante, and the poet’s eponym, the Cantos testify to life’s senselessness, the necessity of being beheaded, and the love of saints. It is an intoxicated and uncompromising vision: The name of you / Who alter one atom of my sigh is now stricken from life.

“Not since Die Nachtwachen (The Nightwatches), published in 1804 under the pseudonym of Bonaventura, a German Romantic of often-attributed yet arguably still uncertain identity, has there appeared such a book as Cantos for the Crestfallen. Also written by an unknown hand, one drenched in a philosophy and poetics of an apocalyptic tone, the latter title rivals its predecessor in both mystery and melancholy. At the same time that the authors of these works tear the mask from the dark face of the inhuman comedy, they practice a reckless wit that makes the blackness of our lives blacker still. Cantos for the Crestfallen in particular flows with gruesome conceits that empty into an ocean of tears, ultimately drowning its reader far from the sight of land, of home, and of hope.” – Thomas Ligotti

“Like his namesake-by-declamatio, the author of Cantos for the Crestfallen has managed to condense all human afflictions into one solitary fusion of despair, a misery with teeth enough to bite the hand off every nescient and conciliatory illusion. And yet to underpin this breathless, almost throttled, ennui (his own sigh even “drowning in air”) there is the resolve and the bitterness of a love affair gone wrong, the unrequited affections, the raw feels of the world’s interminable spurning; and all of it a lie, a necrophile’s symphony tapped out by a heart made ash of, a heart crawling up a corkscrewed spine to die inside a brain.” – Gary J. Shipley

“Pseudo-Leopardi’s Cantos exhale a spirit of blackened occidental sufism that will make your head spiral.” – Pir Iqbal the Impaled

“From the enhaloed entrails of a forgotten notebook comes these Cantos for the Crestfallen. These poems describe nothing and enact everything—litanies of a moldering solar refusal.” – Rasu-Yong Tugen, Baroness de Tristeombre

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Songs from the Black Moon

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Rasu-Yong Tugen, Baroness de TristeombreSongs from the Black Moon. ISBN-13: 978-0615969008. ISBN-10: 0615969003. gnOme, 2014. 80 pp. Text and images. $9.99.

All the trees whose names we have forgotten have long since embraced our entwined limbs.

In the tradition of the 19th century, fin-de-siècle prose poem, Songs from the Black Moon is a dark elegy for an already-forgotten planet and its wandering, somnambulistic inhabitants.

“A book of beautiful and strangely tranquil outbursts of disaffection and dissolution. I wish everyone on earth lived by the sentiments expressed within it.” — Thomas Ligotti

“In search of an atrabilious poetics that might render breathable the ‘black abyss’ within, the Baronesse de Tristeombre has written an apocryphal rejoinder to the Book of Lamentations, filled with salt, sand, crystal and leprous flesh. Read this grimoire of ‘tectonic sorrow’ and despair anew.” — Drew Daniel, author of The Melancholy Assemblage

“In the black light of these lunar songs, you and I despair for the last time, again.”
Pseudo-Leopardi, author of Cantos for the Crestfallen

“Songs from the Black Moon resurrects the literary tradition of Dark Romanticism – poetry that is stark, sparse, and drenched in a blackened lyricism . . . These poems are ecstatic lamentations for the world-without-us . . . ” — Eugene Thacker, author of In The Dust of This Planet

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How to Stay in Hell

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Y. O. U.. How to Stay in Hell: Inspiring Instructions for Daily Living. ISBN-13: 978-0615953236 ISBN-10: 0615953239. gnOme, 2014. 36 pages. $6.66.

Hell is a special place. Some people say that God created Hell, but Hell is more special than that.

“An exceptional step by step guide for living a life of true and open awareness within the confines of this earthly world, How to Stay in Hell cuts deep to the heart of existence and eschews the binary simplicity of classic fire and brimstone hellscapes for the more tangible reality of Hell; the Hell of this very Being. Following the traditions of self-realization and self-actualization, How to Stay in Hell is sure to become an indispensable blueprint for personal achievement alongside Musashi’s The Book of Five Rings, or Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Don’t just stay in Hell, Master staying in Hell.” –V.C. Dark Magus Emeritus of the Order of the Black Mark

“…all the terrible and beneficent forces of mysterious Nature whose dark secret powers keep your life dynamically in place each moment of your life, waking you up in the morning and putting you to sleep at night, filling our bodies with pleasure and pain, our imaginations with fantasy and nightmare, our minds with ideas and anxieties. We are talking about the impossible everything that holds the whole universe in place around the single finite pole of you.” Kant by way of Vernon Howard, How to Stay in Hell should be required reading for anyone who refuses to let go of the idea that art’s greatest responsibility is to affirm life or that living life in itself is an art. Of course, thankfully, neither of those statements are true.” — David Peak, author of The River Through the Trees

“A short tract of pessimist self-help which cuts to the heart of the mundane of horror of being you. Through a series of twenty affirmations of some of humanity’s most essential sick habits — e.g. ‘believing in yourself’, ‘making plans’, ‘practicing the personal touch’, ‘cherishing one’s opinion’ — the text provides a clear and effective guide for STAYING IN HELL. The book will make you laugh, because it is true. But it is not funny, the joke is on you.” – Törpe Könyvek

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Bergmetal: Oro-Emblems of the Musical Beyond

bergmetal front cover copy - CopyNab Saheb & Denys X. Arbaris. Bergmetal: Oro-Emblems of the Musical Beyond. ISBN-13: 978-1494907204 ISBN-10: 1494907208. HWORDE, 2014. 116 pages.

Bergmetal is a collaborative exploratory tract on the trisonic intersections of MOUNTAINS, MYSTICISM, and HEAVY METAL. Mixing theoretical reflection and studious redaction into ascending gestures of alpine musical thought, the book proceeds via seven poetic emblems plus commentary addressing works by Bathory, Darkthrone, Sleep, Aluk Todolo, Omega Massif, Schrei aus Stein, and Sapthuran. Opening essays by the authors on the ideals and history of the bergmetal genre provide a logistical starting point and contextual basecamp.

“A casual email…a voidal exposure…! In this slim volume, metal, lyrics, and philosophy combine – “with spirit deathless, endless, infinite” – to launch a ferocious assault on the imagination!” – Manabrata Guha, Prize Fellow, Univ. of Bath

“A strange creature I am now, burnt by the sun and yet frozen, clung onto my will to take just another step” — Stormcrow

“Metal! Mysticism! Mountains! Whoever loves one will be interested in this book. Whoever loves two will like it. Whoever loves all three might be in paradise.” – Nicola Masciandaro

“An ascent into the wilderness of alpine aesthetics and heavy metallurgies, with poetry, mysticism, and esoteric philosophy illuminating the peaks and abysses of sublime human experience alongside the indifferent expanse of geological time.” — RH, Schrei aus Stein

“It’s about time somebody published a serious piece of heavy metal commentary, and Bergmetal is it.” — Alex Sutcliffe, Lurkerspath

“Ihre Musik, die Texte, das Artwork, das Konzept, führen den Kommentator auf eine sowohl kulturelle wie auch geologische interpretation der Bergwelt. Harter Stoff, aber dafür umso faszinierender!” — Dominik Irtenkauf, Legacy Magazine

BOMB @ goodreads

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Blackest Ever Hole

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Brian O’Blivion. Blackest Ever Hole. ISBN-10: 0615752292. ISBN-13: 978-0615752297. gnOme, 2012. 78 pages.

“These poems are dark energy vectors pulsating as phantasms through the ultimacy of sorcerous vision! These ‘transmissions from oblivion’ are the rotting fruit of some shadowy realm where the imaginal traverses the actual . . . This degenerate volume weeps blood at the smell of lunar shadows poised to deter the exsanguination of sphinxes –– the elliptical orbit of coarse interstellar viscera. This swarm of shadows orbits a spectral influence confining the actual to the furthest chambers of magnetic pulsars equidistant to cellular levels of vampiric tendrils feasting on alien lavender and hound’s blood. Reality is mortally wounded –– punctured by the blackened bones of the imaginal. This is the smell of its flesh.” — Anonymous, HTMLGIANT

“Like some undecidable fugue from an all-too-familiar world that should not be, this seductively anti-lyrical sequence of existential horror-verse will quietly pummel you back into a void blacker than that from which you sprang, in other words, restore your wingéd senses to the ( )hole beneath our feet.” — M.O.N.

“This book is dark. The words are dark. The setting is dark. The craft is dark.” — Ben Spivey, author of Black God

BEH @ goodreads

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